Prostatectomy

What is Prostatectomy?

Prostatectomy is a surgical procedure for the removal of all or part of the prostate gland. The operation is done because of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia), as well as for prostate cancer and other cancers of the pelvis that cause urinary retention.

Prostatectomy illustration

There are two kinds of prostatectomies. A simple prostatectomy (also referred to as subtotal prostatectomy) is the partial removal of the prostate. Simple prostatectomies are mostly done for benign conditions.

benign prostatic hyperplasia illustration

A radical prostatectomy is the removal of the entire prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and the vas deference. It is done to treat prostate cancer.

Radical Prostatectomy

Radical prostatectomy can be performed using four main techniques which take about 3 to 4 hours.

Retropubic

Your surgeon will make an incision between your belly button and pubic bone. This surgery takes 2 to 4 hours.

Laparoscopic

Your surgeon creates 3-4 small cuts instead of one big cut. Long, thin devices are inserted into the cuts. The surgeon positions a thin tube with a video camera (laparoscope) inside one of the cuts. This gives your surgeon the ability to see inside your belly during the procedure.

Perineal

Your surgeon creates an incision in the skin between the anus and the perineum (base of the scrotum). The incision is small compared to the retropubic technique. This technique usually requires less time and causes less loss of blood. However, the surgeon will have a harder time conserving the nerves around the prostate or to remove nearby lymph nodes with this technique.

Take the first step and contact us through our no-cost virtual consultation. During this process, we will recommend options that will work best for you. Every client is different, so our virtual consultants and surgeons tailor the procedure to match each person’s needs.

Risks of Surgery

Risks of prostatectomy include:

  • Bowel incontinence (difficulty controlling bowel movements)
  • Urinary incontinence (difficulty controlling urine)
  • Impotence (erection problems)
  • Rectum injury
  • Tightening of the urinary opening due to scar tissue (urethral stricture)

Before The Procedure

You will have a thorough physical exam and may need other tests. Your team will make certain that medical problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart or lung problems are managed before the procedure.

  • Stop smoking a few weeks before surgery. Nicotine interferes with healing.
  • Inform your surgeon or nurse what drugs, vitamins, and supplements that you are taking.

Weeks Before Surgery

  • You will be required to avoid taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Naprosyn), vitamin E, warfarin Coumadin), and any drug that will make it hard for your blood to clot.
  • On the day before surgery, drink just clean fluids.
  • In some cases, your nurse will give you a special laxative on the day before your surgery. This will clean your colon of unnecessary contents.

On the Day of the Surgery

  • Avoid drinking or eating anything after midnight before the surgery.
  • Take the medicines that your surgeon prescribed with a small sip of water.

Your surgeon or nurse will explain to you the schedule and how to prepare yourself hours before the surgery.

Take the first step and contact us through our no-cost virtual consultation. During this process, we will recommend options that will work best for you. Every client is different, so our virtual consultants and surgeons tailor the procedure to match each person’s needs.

After The Procedure

The majority of patients stay in the hospital for one to five days. After laparoscopic surgery, you can go home the day after the procedure.

You will be instructed to stay in bed until the morning after the procedure. You are advised to move around as much as you can.

Your nurse will assist you in changing positions in bed and teach you simple exercises to maintain blood flow. You must do these actions every 1 to 2 hours.

After the procedure you may:

  • Put on special stockings on your legs to reduce the risk of blood clots.
  • Be given pain medication through your veins or mouth.
  • Experience spasms in your bladder.
  • Have a catheter in your bladder by the time you return home.

Outlook

The surgical procedure will ideally get rid of the cancer cells. But your doctor will keep an eye on you closely to ensure cancer does not return. You will have routine checkups as well as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests.

Take the first step and contact us through our no-cost virtual consultation. During this process, we will recommend options that will work best for you. Every client is different, so our virtual consultants and surgeons tailor the procedure to match each person’s needs.

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